One Health Next Gen

One Health Workforce Next Generation

 

In 2014, the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched to “accelerate progress towards a world safe and secure from global health threats posed by infectious disease.” A central component of the GHSA strategy is building the capacity of the global health workforce to prevent, detect, and respond to emerging infectious diseases. Beyond the concentrated attention in the GHSA Action Package dedicated to workforce development, there are milestones throughout the 11 Action Packages which aim to equip a new, transformed, transdisciplinary workforce with the tools and capacities needed for quick detection, action and collaboration across sectors to prevent and stop disease where it starts.

The USAID One Health Workforce (OHW) Project, also launched in 2014, aims to achieve such a workforce transformation. Focusing on two infectious disease hot spot regions, Central and Eastern Africa and Southeast Asia, OHW strengthens training and educational programs in universities to create a skilled workforce in using a transdisciplinary approach known as One Health.  The One Health approach brings together disciplines such as medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, nursing, ecology to work together to more effectively address emerging challenges at the interface of animals, humans and the environment.  Emerging infectious diseases are one of the most pressing of such challenges.

Emerging Pandemic Threats

 

In 2014, the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched to “accelerate progress towards a world safe and secure from global health threats posed by infectious disease.” A central component of the GHSA strategy is building the capacity of the global health workforce to prevent, detect, and respond to emerging infectious diseases. Beyond the concentrated attention in the GHSA Action Package dedicated to workforce development, there are milestones throughout the 11 Action Packages which aim to equip a new, transformed, transdisciplinary workforce with the tools and capacities needed for quick detection, action and collaboration across sectors to prevent and stop disease where it starts.

The USAID One Health Workforce (OHW) Project, also launched in 2014, aims to achieve such a workforce transformation. Focusing on two infectious disease hot spot regions, Central and Eastern Africa and Southeast Asia, OHW strengthens training and educational programs in universities to create a skilled workforce in using a transdisciplinary approach known as One Health.  The One Health approach brings together disciplines such as medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, nursing, ecology to work together to more effectively address emerging challenges at the interface of animals, humans and the environment.  Emerging infectious diseases are one of the most pressing of such challenges.

The One Health Workforce

 

In 2014, the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched to “accelerate progress towards a world safe and secure from global health threats posed by infectious disease.” A central component of the GHSA strategy is building the capacity of the global health workforce to prevent, detect, and respond to emerging infectious diseases. Beyond the concentrated attention in the GHSA Action Package dedicated to workforce development, there are milestones throughout the 11 Action Packages which aim to equip a new, transformed, transdisciplinary workforce with the tools and capacities needed for quick detection, action and collaboration across sectors to prevent and stop disease where it starts.

The USAID One Health Workforce (OHW) Project, also launched in 2014, aims to achieve such a workforce transformation. Focusing on two infectious disease hot spot regions, Central and Eastern Africa and Southeast Asia, OHW strengthens training and educational programs in universities to create a skilled workforce in using a transdisciplinary approach known as One Health.  The One Health approach brings together disciplines such as medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, nursing, ecology to work together to more effectively address emerging challenges at the interface of animals, humans and the environment.  Emerging infectious diseases are one of the most pressing of such challenges.